Bevacizumab ASP Pricing now Dropping With Biosimilar Entries

With the announcement that Pfizer has formally launched its bevacizumab biosimilar Zirabev®, the next logical question is how the price compares with the competition—Roche’s brand Avastin® and Amgen’s biosimilar Mvasi® that are already available.

At Pfizer’s stated pricing of $61.34 for a 10-mg vial, this represents a 23% discount to the reference product’s wholesale acquisition cost. It also represents a 12% discount to Avastin’s average sales price ([ASP] defined as the price after discounts and rebates).

Amgen launched Mvasi in the summer of 2019 at a 15% discount to the WAC price of Avastin (and a 12% discount to the ASP of the reference product at that time). This month is the first where Mvasi’s ASP has been published, which at $69.77 means a 12% lower cost for Pfizer’s Zirabev.

In January 2017, the ASP price for Avastin was $73.73, which rose 10% to $81.18 in January 2019. Between January 2019 and For January 2020, the ASP for the reference product dropped 0.7%. The ASP is what Medicare will reimburse for the drug, and because it does reflect net costs after discounts and rebates, it is a pretty good measure of pricing trends in the commercial market as well. The signs point to a halt in Avastin price rises, and a likely significant drop through the end of 2020.

bevacizumab prices dropping
Net Pricing of Bevacizumab Agents Dropping With New Competition

By that time, the next competitive entry into this category, Samsung Bioepis’ SB8, may launch. Samsung Bioepis is awaiting a fourth quarter decision by the Food and Drug Administration.

These prices may sound reasonable. Keep in mind, however, that a usual dose for bevacizumab in several cancer treatments is 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks—in other words, 70 10-mg vials are needed for a patient weighing 154 pounds (or $5,644 per treatment at Avastin’s current ASP).

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