Federal Policy and Biosimilars: A Conversation With Molly Burich, MS, Boehringer Ingelheim: Part 2

In part two and the conclusion of this interview, Molly Burich, MS, Director, Public Policy: Biosimilars and Pipeline, speaks to Boehringer Ingelheim’s progress in Cytelzo interchangeability studies, its plans for the product in Europe in the face of several adalimumab biosimilars launches in the EU, and also the complexity inherent in CMS’s plans to move biologic agents from part B to part D coverage.

Molly Burich, Boehringer Ingelheim
Molly Burich, MS

BR&R: Boehringer Ingelheim indicated that it started the study on Cytelzo interchangeability last year. What’s the progress on this effort?

Burich: The trial is continuing to progress. It’s a high bar and a big commitment. We will certainly publicize relevant information in due course.

We feel that for Cyltezo, in particular, interchangeability is an important component. It may drive switching. The study will also show a complement of clinical data around that topic. We hope to have information to share in the future. [Editor’s Note: The VOLTAIRE-X study, which will evaluate the effect of switching between Cyltezo and Humira in patients with plaque psoriasis, has an estimated primary study completion date of March 2020 and full study completion of July 2020, according to ClinicalTrials.gov]

BR&R: Speaking about Cyltezo, I have a question about the marketing floodgates being opened in the EU for adalimumab biosimilars. At least 4 are being launched in the EU after the October 16th patent expiration. Does Boehringer Ingelheim plan to join the fray?

Burich: Boehringer Ingelheim had planned to bring Cyltezo to patients in the EU. Due to the patent litigation with AbbVie in the US, we will not commercialize Cyltezo in the EU. Boehringer Ingelheim will continue all activities for our biosimilar in the United States. We are committed to making Cyltezo® available to U.S. patients as soon as possible and certainly before 2023.

PART B TO PART D TRANSITION BY CMS 

BR&R: Medicare has indicated that it will move many Medicare part B drugs into part D. To what extent will this affect biosimilar access and utilization?

Burich: It is a very hot topic these days. We have some pretty significant concerns on conceptually around what it means for moving from part B to part D. The key reason revolves around the access question, including patient cost sharing.

A move from part B to plan D could mean that patient cost sharing may jump significantly. We know that part B beneficiaries have wraparound or Medigap coverage to protect them from cost sharing issues. In part D, there is not such protection. Aside from the biosimilar question, the move from part B to part D really has to be explored and discussed a lot more to understand how we can ensure that patient access is not reduced through high cost sharing. That needs to be ironed out as it applies to any part B drug before we can speculate whether this is an opportunity for a biosimilar. Time will tell what that really looks like.

Last month, CMS released the Medicare Advantage guidance allowing for step therapy for part B drugs. That could be a potential opportunity for biosimilars, if we know how some of the access concerns will be addressed. We just don’t have the full picture at this point.

BR&R: Is it possible that this move to part D might spur some payers to create biosimilar tiers? These would require lower cost sharing for patients compared with reference biologics, assuming contracts with the reference manufacturer permits it.

Burich: In my opinion, we’ll need access to more biosimilars before we see a lot of that activity. It’s hard to foresee what big benefit design changes will be coming, but it’s certainly possible. We’ll need a mature market in the US before that will happen.

BR&R: The devil is in the details with this switching issue but there’s also an access issue. Plans can make midyear formulary changes, this would then apply to biosimilars and reference drugs covered under part D.

Burich: This is an important issue. The latest guidance that we saw from CMS, which is now a couple of years old, allowed positive formulary changes. Adding the biosimilar to a formulary is always allowed mid-year. The question involves removing an originator product or changing its tier.

CMS has said that those situations would be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. These rules preventing negative formulary changes midyear are there to protect patient access. It will take CMS some time to iron out what the process looks like for this type of potential formulary change midyear. For now, we’ll have to rely on CMS’s case-by-case review

BR&R: In general, payers do not consistently fund and manage self-injectable specialty drugs in the same way. In some cases, they cover these agents under the pharmacy benefits, medical benefit, or even both. Further, they can be managed under either benefit as well. However, it seems we are moving toward pharmacy management of these agents. How does this affect biosimilar access, if at all?

Burich: There will be more benefit design changes once we have a more robust biosimilar market. More specifically, when we have pharmacy benefit biosimilars.

We’ve mentioned CMS’s intention to move more of these products from part B to part D. It is possible that commercial plans will have different benefit designs and treat injectables differently than Medicare does. We want to make sure that biosimilar or not, the access piece is really at the center of those changes; it will not be beneficial to the biosimilar market if this move causes significant patient access issues (e.g., actual access to this drug or big swings in cost sharing). All of those things will be equally problematic for a biosimilar as they are for an originator, so we want to make sure we have our eye on the access component.

BR&R: Health and Human Services Secretary Azar and FDA Commissioner Gottlieb have loudly stated their desire to improve biosimilar patient and market access. The Biosimilar Action Plan was released earlier in the summer to that end. What is the one aspect of the Biosimilar Action Plan that appeals most to manufacturers like Boehringer Ingelheim?

Burich: The aspect of education, tackling both proactive education and countering misinformation is very critical from our perspective. We’d like to see more materials moving forward that focus on switching and on interchangeability. We haven’t really scratched the surface on those topics from an education standpoint.

The reality is that the FDA has an important voice and bringing validity to educational materials is so critical for patients, physicians, and health plans as well. We hope that the FDA will stand by its public commitment to release more reading materials, more videos, more web info, etc. It is especially important at this juncture; we are seeing misinformation and a lack of clarity on certain things.

IS THE BIOSIMILAR ACTION PLAN ACTIONABLE?

BR&R: One of the biggest barriers to biosimilar access is the patent thickets. The rebate trap problem is another story. What power does HHS have to clear out the patent thickets? Or is this an area that can only be addressed by Congress?

Burich: This is the most difficult part of the Action Plan, because it is unclear who can truly implement change and what change might be realistic. We have to protect true innovation that’s important to all stakeholders.

At the same time, there’s no question that patent litigation is the leading barrier to biosimilar accesss. Some makers of branded pharmaceuticals have constructed patent thickets so that they could sustain prolonged, expensive litigation against competitors, while stifling competition. Humira is the prime example: More than 15 years after the molecule was approved , no biosimilar is being marketed – in the U.S. What the answer is and which government agency can effect change has yet to be determined.

BR&R: That change won’t come quickly, in any case. Whether enacted by Congress or the Office of the Inspector General, which may have to reinterpret the safe harbor statutes, this may only first apply to the second-generation of biosimilar agents, beyond 2021 perhaps. It seems likely that this will be a very deliberate process.

Burich: I do believe Commissioner Gottlieb is thinking about both how to get more products launched in the short term and also the long-term vision of a sustainable biosimilar market. That is such an important part of the problem.

We were very happy that the FDA had their public hearing. The FDA panel asked a lot of thoughtful and probing questions to the individual speakers. We are fully supportive of the Action Plan and its individual components. If we saw all of those things come together and start to see action, including finalizing the interchangeability guidance and providing more education, the biosimilar market would be in a far better place.

BR&R: We say that biosimilar manufacturers can make their products attractive to payers, but payers need to play a positive role here. Commissioner Gottlieb has said that payers have to help in this process by taking the long-term view, by not automatically sticking with the reference product because of the rebate revenue. They have to be open to using the biosimilars and nurturing the health of the industry. Is there anything else the biosimilar manufacturer can do to convince payers to make this market viable?

Burich: Certainly, biosimilar manufacturers have to approach these payer negotiations and conversations with competitive and innovative contracting approaches. That does not just include pricing but also how do you drive volume and true savings to both payers and patients. That kind of innovative approach is necessary, because we know it’s a challenging market.

Biosimilar manufacturers have to look at the whole picture as well. That means providing targeted patient/physician services to really help ensure that the switching experience is seamless for the patient and the physician so that biosimilar utilization is not viewed as something very disruptive.

Word From the Adalimumab Front: A Conversation With Molly Burich, MS, Boehringer Ingelheim: Part 1

In the first portion of a two-part interview with Molly Burich, MS, Director, Public Policy: Biosimilars and Pipeline, Boehringer Ingelheim, we cover the challenges of driving biosimilar uptake, as well as the unique situation that has focused this manufacturer’s attention on biosimilars and interchangeability. 

BR&R: The viability of the US biosimilar industry is being challenged if companies cannot rely on revenue from switching, especially for the autoimmune category.

Molly Burich, Boehringer Ingelheim
Molly Burich, MS

Molly Burich: Yes, biosimilar uptake is certainly going to be dependent on switching. But switching comes in a few different types. One case involves patients who are going to be switched to a therapy with a different mechanism of action. Perhaps their existing therapy no longer works (or didn’t work in the first place).

Another case is medication substitution by the physician. The doctor drives that decision to switch the patient either to a biosimilar or to an interchangeable.

Lastly is automatic substitution, which will come as a result of interchangeability and enabled by state laws. However, that is only in play once a product gains the interchangeability designation.

All of those are important components, but certainly switching overall is an important part of the market viability.

BR&R: When we’re talking about automatic switching, multiple stakeholders are involved, including the prescribers, pharmacies, payers, patients. And none of it matters if we don’t have an interchangeable product or even final guidelines from the FDA on interchangeability. In retrospect, should we have made automatic switching for biosimilars based on something other than interchangeability?

Burich: There are a lot of stakeholders involved and this is. why multiple ways of switching will likely occur. In terms of switching, interchangeability allows pharmacists to switch one reference product prescription for an interchangeable one without intervention of the physician at the front end—pending state laws of course. The physician must be notified of the change.

In our opinion though, automatic switching is certainly not the only way to drive uptake of biosimilars. We believe physician-driven switching and payer-drive substitution via formulary decision-making are very important to drive the uptake of biosimilars.

BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM’S SINGULAR PRODUCT FOCUS

BR&R: Biosimilar utilization, and the overall market, has been growing slowly since the first biosimilar approval. Prospective biosimilar manufacturers have tended to jump into the market with both feet, filling their pipelines with multiple biosimilar agents. Boehringer Ingelheim may be the only major manufacturer with a single biosimilar listed on its pipeline web page. Is the company in a wait-and-see mode, to see if the industry will survive? Or is Boehringer making further investments in biosimilar development behind the scenes?

Burich: We are constantly in an evaluation process of our portfolio. Obviously, we are focused on our approved biosimilar Cyltezo® (adalimumab-adbm) and also on interchangeability, here in the U.S. That is our focus area. We believe that the introduction of biosimilars will improve the lives of patients, as well as contribute to the quality and economic sustainability of healthcare systems.

INTERCHANGEABILITY: MISUNDERSTOOD BUT NO SILVER BULLET

BR&R: The issues around interchangeability are particularly frustrating. At the time the BPCIA was written, was the concept of interchangeability (which does not exist in EMA regulations) an attempt to give prescribers and consumers a warm and fuzzy feeling of an AB-rated generic?

Burich: It’s an important question. As you said, when the BPCIA was written, interchangeability was viewed as a sort of silver bullet. The reality is that interchangeability is an important concept, but perhaps it makes more sense for only certain products. As we gain experience in the biosimilar market, we’re starting to see this.

We believe in the concept of interchangeability and in what the FDA has put forth about interchangeability. We do think there are questions about how an interchangeable product may be perceived compared with one that is not interchangeable. In our comments to the FDA, we encouraged the FDA to come out with educational materials that are geared toward talking about interchangeability, and talking about switching. These are all important questions and need to be addressed for the broad stakeholder community. The FDA is obviously best positioned to bring that type of education in the next round of materials they develop.

BR&R: We’ve heard a great deal about people mischaracterizing interchangeable products as being superior to biosimilars (for the same reference product). Why is this differentiation so important?

Burich: This issue speaks to education. All people engaging in the biosimilar space must realize that the designation of interchangeability does not mean it’s a higher-quality, safer, or more-efficacious product. It means that the manufacturer has conducted additional studies required by the FDA to enable that automatic substitution at the pharmacy level.

The FDA has issued clarifying pieces of information and education on their website about this, but there is room for more. The reality is that when a drug is approved as a biosimilar, it has attained the foundational designation proving that the drug is highly similar to the reference biologic, without any clinically meaningful differences. On the other hand, gaining the interchangeability designation is about conducting trials of multiple switches within the patient and expecting the same results in any given to patient. Those are two different distinctions. It proves something different, allowing for automatic substitution to occur.

In part two and the conclusion of this interview, which will be published in a separate post, Molly Burich speaks to Boehringer Ingelheim’s progress in Cytelzo’s interchangeability studies, its plans for the product in Europe in the face of several adalimumab biosimilars launches in the EU, and also the complexity inherent in CMS’s plans to move biologic agents from part B to part D coverage. 

More From GRx+Biosims on Four-Letter Suffixes and Biosimilar Interchangeability

The talk at the GRx+Biosims 2018 meeting this month in Baltimore was about challenges, but extrapolation was not one of them. Biosimilar interchangeability was. That was not entirely surprising. In market research projects I’ve been involved with over the past year, payers and physicians in medical groups have broadly indicated that they’ve gotten past the extrapolation question. They are willing to accept the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) decisions on approval for indications for which clinical studies were not performed. In fact, some payers have noted a willingness to not discourage a biosimilar’s use for an indication for which the reference product was approved but the biosimilar was not. This, of course, assumes that it makes economic sense to do so. Many physicians still harbor concerns about switching therapy but not in treatment-naïve patients. In other words, if the payer prefers one product over another in a new patient, they would change their prescribing practices. In other words, they would not “rather fight than switch.”

Instead, the meeting, which was sponsored by the Association for Affordable Medicines and its Biosimilars Council, raised other questions, including the rationale behind the four-letter suffix and the complexities around biosimilar interchangeability.

Are Four-Letter Suffixes Needed?

Two greater questions were raised, one very practical and one theoretical one. The first involves the issue of the random (or sometimes not, as in -sndz) four-letter suffix, which is required for biosimilars in the US, but nowhere else in the world. Japan requires biosimilars to be designated with a standard “–bs” suffix. However, the European Medicines Agency does not utilize any suffixes and relies upon the international nonproprietary name (INN) for tracking purposes.

To make matters more complicated, the FDA intends to retroactively provide a suffix to all reference products as well, which no doubt will challenge billing and coding systems. The question is currently unanswered in the US as to whether interchangeable products will carry a unique suffix or share the same suffix as the reference product.

Hillel Cohen, PhD, Execubiosimilar interchangeabilitytive Director of Scientific Affairs for Sandoz, believes that these suffixes will not enhance the ability to track the use of biosimilars. Despite not using any special designations, “if you look at the European experience,” he said, “96% of safety reports have been made with proper attribution.” He pointed to the small database of biosimilar use accruing in the US. “Out of 65 safety reports registered so far, 62 came in with the brand name,” Dr. Cohen said. “None of the 65 reports were entered with the four-letter suffix.”

More on Biosimilar Interchangeability

Questions around biosimilar interchangeability still abound, partly because the FDA has not yet issued final guidelines around the approval process. Apart from the misconception that a product earning the FDA’s interchangeable stamp of approval is a “better” product than an ordinary biosimilar, two specific questions were explored, one of which is mind-boggling, the other merely frustrating.

The challenge extends from the expectation of lot-to-lot variation that occurs with biologic manufacturing. Assume that biosimilar A obtains FDA approval as an interchangeable medication, based on the switching studies against a reference product. As time passes, this manufacturing “drift” occurs. In a conversation with Dr. Cohen, he asked, “Is the biosimilar still interchangeable with the reference agent?” In other words, will the drug maker have to conduct more clinical switching studies to maintain this level of confidence, proving once again that the drug will provide equivalent outcomes in all patients compared with a reference product that is now also subtly different?

The second theoretical question arises from one I had discussed in an earlier post, the law of transitivity. If drug B is a biosimilar to infliximab, and drug C is approved as a biosimilar to infliximab, too, are drugs B and C biosimilars to each other? The answer, according to the FDA, would be no, because they have not be evaluated for physiochemical similarity to each other, only separately to the reference product. However, for payers, the answer is not so clear.

Dr. Cohen took that question one step further. If at some point in time, there are biosimilars A and D, both of which have been granted interchangeable status to adalimumab, are they interchangeable with each other? Again, the official answer would be no, because that is not how the testing was performed.

This brings up another intriguing question: if I’m living in a state that passed legislation allowing for automatic substitution of an interchangeable product, can a payer substitute interchangeable biosimilar A for interchangeable biosimilar D, if the former is the preferred product based on contracting? Technically, if the physician prescribed biosimilar D specifically, the pharmacy would not be able to substitute, without the doctor’s consent. The FDA has not designated biosimilars A and D as interchangeable for each other, only the reference product Humira®. The concept of biosimilar interchangeability is still, many years after passage of the BPCIA, an enigma.

Of course, based our situation in September 2018, this scenario is purely speculation, and will require multiple drug makers spending their R&D dollars to attain interchangeable status (to the same originator drug). That’s one reason why I like attending these conferences—they offer exposure to new, often confounding ideas!

State Biosimilar Laws Need Clarity and Consistency

Although 41 states currently have passed legislation to enable plans to substitute interchangeable biosimilars, these state biosimilar laws seem an attempt to put the cart in front of the horse. Reginia Benjamin, JD, Director of Legislative Affairs, at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy, explained that the first state legislation to optimize the use of biosimilars was signed in 2013, before any were approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
Biosimilars Review Biosimilar ReportsMs. Benjamin’s presentation last week at the annual meeting of the AMCP in Boston highlighted the fact that by the time Zarxio®, the first biosimilar was approved, 10 states had similar laws on the books.

The individual state biosimilar laws do vary quite a bit. Some of them specified that notification must be given to the provider (via phone, fax, or notation in the EMR) that a reference product is being substituted. She added that these requirements are generally above and beyond what is mandated for the dispensing of other medications.

At the time the majority of these laws were enacted, the FDA had not yet defined the criteria for an interchangeable biosimilar.
As a result, the medications’ definition of interchangeability varies in some states’ legislation. For example, they may rely on the way the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCIA) framed interchangeability, which is less specific than the FDA’s current guidelines.

To complicate matters, said Ms. Benjamin, states may also refer to a level of therapeutic equivalence as defined by the FDA’s Orange Book. However, the Orange Book does not address biologics, only small molecules. The Purple Book would be the appropriate reference, but this was only introduced in 2014.

Additional state legislative language, which is not uniform, includes the following:

  • Patients must be notified before receiving the biosimilar medicine (and varying timeframes for such notification)
  • Receipt of patient approval of the interchanged biosimilar before dispensing
  • Requirements to state boards of pharmacy produce a website with information on FDA-approved interchangeable biosimilars
  • Limits on liability for pharmacists who substitute a biosimilar for a reference product (ie, no greater liability exists than for filling any other prescription)

Ms. Benjamin stated that “state laws are inconsistent with the intent of the BPCIA,” for instance, pharmacists do not have independent authority to substitute a biosimilar agent for the originator product without the approval of the health provider. They fail to recognize the Purple Book as the FDA’s reference source for information about the interchangeability of biosimilars.

She concluded that education is key in providing stakeholders to better inform them of the potential for these drugs, “to provide increased access to safe and more cost-effective drugs.”

Analyzing FDA Chief Gottlieb’s Remarks: One Challenge With no Easy Solution

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, undoubtedly understands the threat to a successful biosimilar industry in the US, and his well-reported remarks emphasize some of the key issues. The policies that the FDA Commissioner wants to bring to bear on the multifaceted problem may be harder to implement. In this post, we examine one of those issues.

FDA Commissioner Scott GottliebIn the CNBC interview on Wednesday, he stated, “We’re taking a hard look at how we determine interchangeability so that we can make determinations that biosimilars can be used interchangeably with the brand of drugs.” Dr. Gottlieb correctly pointed out that the interchangeability question is complicated by “variants in lot-to-lot manufacturing of existing biologics and also a lot of variance in the products over time where there’s drift in the sort of formulation of the biologics that are currently on the market.” The variations that manufacturers of any biologics encounter create a “moving target” for not simply a manufacturer trying to prove biosimilarity but also interchangeability. He acknowledged that unexpected clinical effects of these variations have not yet been seen but the potential exists, which is why certain variations are subject to testing by the regulators to address the problem.

Yet, it is not practical to eliminate the lot-to-lot variation that has been seen for decades, sometimes incurred by plant changes or subtly different manufacturing techniques. Does this mean that biosimilar makers will have to test their agent against more samples of the originator biologic and in studies with more patients? For the purposes of proving interchangeability, the variation could undermine confidence in the outcome.

According to the FDA Commissioner, “We’re going to be putting out a set of policies to compel the branded drug makers who have biologics on the market to tighten up their manufacturing, to have less variance of their biologics that are currently on the market.” Preventing this variation in biologic manufacturing sounds like a costly (and possible futile) exercise. Let’s say for example, that one plant must be shut down for a time owing to maintenance; how does one prevent the manufacturer of a compound that demonstrates slightly different structural folding produced at another plant? Only an expert in biologic manufacturing techniques can answer this question.

 

Is Physician Resistance to Biosimilars Dissipating?

We tend to think of challenges to uptake of approved and marketed biosimilars coming from three areas: (1) the reference product manufacturers, (2) the physicians, and (3) the patients. The patent mazes and rebating strategies characterize the first, and patient advocates’ questions about nonmedical switching describe the last. Physician resistance, however, seems to be on the wane.

I was pleasantly surprised by conversations with health system chief medical officers and medical group administrators speaking about biosimilar implementation and adoption at the annual meeting of the American Medical Group Association last week in Phoenix. If this is any indication, the iPhysician resistance to biosimilars decreasingnitial trepidation of US physicians in using biosimilars in treatment-naïve patients is melting away. Medical society endorsement of the effectiveness of biosimilars and promises of significant cost savings seem to be convincing arguments on physician side. Of course, switching of a reference medication for a biosimilar in a patient established on treatment with the reference product remains another story.

Some of the physicians came to learn about biosimilars rather than share their experiences. They may or may not have been aware of the extensive European experience with specific biosimilar agents and drug classes, but they were willing to accept that (1) if the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had approved the biosimilar, they expect it to be safe and effective and (2) that extrapolation would not be an issue if FDA approved the label. The use of biosimilars for nonapproved indications would be left up to individual physicians (and payers’ prior authorization systems).

It was clear that the potential of biosimilars to save their patients money was of paramount importance. This may signal a changing view that issues regarding safety and efficacy of approved biosimilars will be preempted by the need to address economic needs in initial prescribing for new patients.

There is also an indication that large medical groups and some health systems are willing to leave the decision making to the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. If the P&T Committee places the biosimilar on the formulary, and it is a savings for their new patients, the biosimilar will be used. That also means that biosimilar adoption at this level will be seriously aided by the use of lower cost-sharing tiers for biosimilars. In other words, a separate biosimilar tier that requires less copayment or coinsurance than the reference product could be a real boost to patient use.

In other biosimilar news…Michigan’s governor has signed legislation making it the 37th state to expand its pharmacy laws to allow interchangeable biosimilar substitution. Now if there were only an interchangeable biosimilar to substitute!

Coherus Biosciences announced that it believes that it will obtain FDA approval and commercial launch for its delayed pegfilgrastim biosimilar in the second half of 2018, along with European approval during the same timeframe.

Pfenex disclosed that it is seeking partners for its own pegfilgrastim biosimilar, in addition to its biosimilar candidate to Lucentis®. Its stock price has taken a steep jump in recent weeks, rising to over $6 a share (from $4) since the beginning of March.

Interchangeability: Another Challenging Perspective

Although the FDA has offered a pathway for the interchangeable designation, a recent presentation at the AMCP Nexus meeting shone a new light on some fairly important challenges posed by the interchangeable designation.

Edward Li, PharmD, MPH, Professor of Pharmacy, University of New England, Portland, Maine, raised the Web image 3well-trod issue of manufacturing drift—that over time, the reference product in particular is often subject to slight changes in structure that may be due to manufacturing changes, or other factors. This is an extremely important concept in biosimilars, as it highlights that these biologics can never be exact copies of the biologic drug. In fact, the originator biologic produced today cannot be expected to be exactly the same as the medication that was first approved 15 years ago. Although the structure may have changed subtly in these complex molecules, the clinical effects and outcomes have not materially changed. With interchangeability, Dr. Li said, “There should be no clinically meaningful differences,” in terms of safety, purity, and potency.

Once the FDA assigns the interchangeability designation to a prospective biosimilar or one that has already been marketed (and subsequent studies have provided FDA with the data to conclude that it is interchangeable with the originator), payers expect to be able to freely substitute this biosimilar for the originator at the point of dispensing—an expected boon to health plans and insurers, as well as the biosimilar maker.

However, what of the interchangeable biosimilar in the future? If manufacturing drift continues to occur over the course of time, the variation in the biosimilar and originator product will have introduced new subtle changes compared with that previously used in the approval process. “Differences may accumulate over time,” said Dr. Li, and hypothetically, these can lead to differences in safety and efficacy.” Does the biosimilar manufacturer need to prove interchangeability all over again, five years later? Is there a possibility that the biosimilar can be reduced back to the ranks of ordinary biosimilars?

These are important questions. Only after we have a biosimilar  designated as interchangeable will we be able to broach this question. However, it does perhaps give the reference drug maker a line of defense in sparing loss of marketshare.

Will Approval of an Interchangeable Biosimilar Mean that Others Are Inferior?

In terms of the biosimilar market and utilization, the US has been at least one full decade behind Europe in every respect but one. Yes, we have the EU beat in a game they avoided playing: The interchangeability gambit. The Europeans never defined interchangeability as a separate concept for biosimilars, thus leaving the individual countries to decide whether to allow unencumbered switching of biosimilars for their originator drugs.

As in other areas of biosimilar policy and regulation, the US started very slowly. Leah Christl, PhD, Associate Director for Therapeutic Biologics, OND Therapeutic Biologics and Biosimilars Team, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stated last week at the Drug Industry Association’s annual meeting in Chicago that she expects the first interchangeable biosimilar to be approved within about 2 years. This is probably realistic, based on the timeline of the adoption of the agency’s interchangeability guidelines. Comments on the draft guidance are being read by the FDA at this time. Seven years after the passage of the legislation calling for the biosimilar approval pathway. If there were competitors in this game, we’d be desperately trying to catch up!

It seems unlikely that the FDA has any active 351(k) applications seeking the interchangeability designation, although Dr. Christl did not reveal whether this was the case. The application process is confidential; a submitted application is publicized only if the drug maker issues a press release on its ownDeck 1.png. It would seem premature to seek the interchangeability designation before the FDA’s own guidance on what the review entails is released. This may not prevent a biosimilar manufacturer that has already received approval from taking the quick step towards interchangeability, especially if they have conducted a series of switching studies that meet the FDA’s criteria (e.g., NOR-SWITCH).

Payers are chomping at the bit for an interchangeable product in the 36 states (and 3 pending) that have signed legislation allowing pharmacies to automatically substitute a biosimilar for an originator biologic.

Others have pointed out that the interchangeable biosimilar may be a boon to its manufacturer, but it may have negative effect on competitive markets. For example, a noninterchangeable infliximab may be considered by prescribers or patients somehow inferior to the interchangeable version, devaluing this biosimilar. On the other hand, the maker of “infliximab-int” could experience increased demand and boost prices (or avoid decreasing prices in the face of other noninterchangeable biosimilars coming to the market). And this may be justified. No one really knows the manufacturer’s incremental cost of achieving this designation, based on:

  • The cost of conducting additional switching studies
  • The potential cost of responding to FDA requirements for more data
  • The opportunity cost in marketing time, resulting from a delay in the application or approval

The race for a product with this extremely valuable designation drags on at a snail’s pace. I hope I’m still writing about it by the time someone reaches the finish line.

 

What Happens When Switching Among Biosimilars?

Late last year, I wrote about a biosimilar challenge that could be on the horizon. With the approval of the second infliximab biosimilar (infliximab-abda by Samsung Bioepis), that horizon is a lot closer. However, we are no closer to understanding how to address the issue.

When Renflexis™ is launched in October (it is unknown whether the US Supreme Court ruling that wiped away the 180-day postapproval waiting period will affect this), 3 noninterchangeable versions of infliximab will be available. Based on patient turnover in health plans, the following scenario will soon occur.

 

Lee 2
Image Copyright 2017 by Lee Fogel

Mr. Jones, a 39-year-old man with Crohn’s disease, works for a large self-funded employer. He has been taking Remicade®, the reference product, for some time. In January 2018, his employer decides to change its plan offerings. His new health plan does not cover Remicade, favoring Inflectra® (infliximab-dyyb) instead. He could seek a medical exception to continue on Remicade, but his new plan actually offers considerable incentives to switch, including significantly lower cost sharing. After discussing the situation with his doctor, he makes the change, and experiences much the same clinical results. In 2019, his employer makes another change in plan. And this plan covers Renflexis on the specialty tier but has Remicade available on the higher-cost nonpreferred specialty tier. He and his physician are unsure of the best move.

Keep in mind that it would be rare and probably makes little sense for a health plan to cover both biosimilars and the reference product. At some point, the plan will seek a contract that leverages marketshare. In the scenario above, at what point does the patient unduly risk the development of neutralizing or antidrug antibodies?

No data have been published on switches among 3 biosimilar products. These agents are not designated as interchangeable—though Pfizer’s Inflectra may be closest to it based on its NOR-SWITCH investigations; therefore, no one is truly confident of what might or might not occur with regard to efficacy or safety. I suspect it may be some time before switches among reference product, biosimilar A, biosimilar B, or even biosimilar C may be considered routine.

Patients receiving biologic products for serious chronic diseases may also be subject to case/care management. This is not a clean transition when changing health plans. The situation described above will likely happen in the near future with infliximab and possibly adalimumab (once the patent litigation is cleared). It would be a good idea for health plans and insurers to start reviewing their options now to ensure both patient safety and cost-effective decision making.

Interchangeability Guidance Released, FDA to Require Switching Studies

On January 10, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its long-awaited draft guidance on the interchangeability standard for biosimilar manufacturing.

It’s been quite a while since we have been able to discuss progress on interchangeability, so as a reminder, the practical differentiator between a product designated as biosimilar versus interchangeable is that the latter “may be substituted for the reference product without the intervention of the health care provider who prescribed the reference product.”

Not surprisingly, the critical mandated addition in clinical studies of an interchangeable biosimilar is the conduct of a sufficient number of switching studies; that is, studies where patients are alternatively given the originator product, switched to the biosimilar, and possibly back to the originator, without any measurable risk to patient safety or efficacy. Or as the FDA puts it “the risk in terms of safety or diminished efficacy of alternating or switching between use of the biological product and the reference product is not greater than the risk of using the reference product without such alternation or switch.”

Interestingly, the FDA does restrict switching studies to between the biosimilar and the US-licensed reference product only (i.e., no EU versions with bridging studies). The reason is related to slight, nonclinically meaningful differences that may be introduced in the EU version that is not present in the US originator product.

The draft guidance is subject to a 60-day public comment period. For those interested in commenting on the guidance, they can visit https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2017-01042.pdf for instructions.