More Adalimumab News: Abbvie Signs a Licensing Deal With Coherus, Coherus Sues Amgen for Patent Infringement

The multitude of companies that have lined up to sign 2023 licensing agreements with Abbvie on sales of Humira® biosimilars has grown again. The latest biosimilar maker added to the list is Coherus Biosciences.

Coherus adalimumab biosimilar

Coherus has an investigational adalimumab biosimilar that completed a phase 3 trial in 2017 in patients with plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. CHS-1420 was found to yield similar clinical outcomes compared with the reference product.

According to the press release from Coherus announcing the deal, the biosimilar will be available for marketing December 15, 2023. This will make it the eighth biosimilar version of adalimumab to enter the market, with Amgen entering first, in January of that year. As with the other deals signed by Abbvie, this signing concludes any patent litigation between the parties and Coherus will pay royalties to Abbvie on the sales of its biosimilar.

Coherus is expected to file a submission with the European Medicines Agency, though the timing of this filing has not been disclosed. Furthermore, it has not yet signed a deal with a marketing partner. In past conference calls, the biosimilar maker has indicated that it will not focus its resources on sales of its products outside the US.  

COHERUS SUES AMGEN OVER ADALIMUMAB PATENTS

To complicate matters a bit more, Coherus has launched a patent infringement suit against Amgen, believed to be the first of a biosimilar maker against another. Amgen’s Amjevita® was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2016, and has been for sale in the EU. Coherus intends to file for FDA approval in Q4 2019. Coherus contends that Amgen’s manufacture of Amjevita violates Coherus’ US patents 10,155,039; 10,159,732; and 10,159,733. These patents involve the creation of stable aqueous formulations of adalimumab.

Coherus seeks “damages adequate to compensate for past, present, and future infringement,” which could have implications for revenues from the European sales of Amgen’s biosimilar, because of its manufacture in the US. In addition, Coherus seeks an injunction from the court that permanently enjoins Amgen from engaging in further alleged infringement.  

Coherus President and CEO Denny Lanfear said in its January 25th press release, “Coherus recognized early on the central role intellectual property would play in advancing biosimilars to market. One important element of our IP strategy for advancing [CHS-1420] is reflected in the success we’ve achieved in patenting our innovations in the field of adalimumab formulation. We believe in the strength of our IP and we intend to protect it.”

Although generic manufacturers engaging in patent suits with competitors has occasionally occurred, this may be a first in the biosimilar community. I suppose it was only a matter of time.

Coherus Biosciences Reaffirms Its Pegfilgrastim Biosimilar Hopes

Coherus Biosciences expects to have an approval decision on its pegfilgrastim biosimilar from the Food and Drug Administration by November 3, 2018. On a quarterly investor call on May 10, Chief Executive Officer Denny Lanfear also related that an approval decision from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on this product is expected by June 28, 2018. “In the meantime, he said, we will continue building product inventory and establishing our commercial infrastructure to ensure a successful product launch.”

Biosimilars Review & Report; BR&R; pegfilgrastim biosimilarsThe conference call highlighted several notable items, including a distinct focus on the US market over the EU, primarily because of the latter’s reliance on a tender system. James Hassard, Senior Vice President, Market Access, explained that the tender system magnifies the competitive nature of biosimilar pricing. Individual countries, he said, because of their specific systems and environments can still be attractive. Mr. Hassard pointed to Scandinavia as a potential European target.

In addition, Mr. Lanfear noted that the $4 billion US market for pegfilgrastim in the US is far larger than that in Europe (< $1 billion). As a result, Coherus will likely seek a partner to help commercialize its biosimilars outside of the US, while tackling the American market itself.

The executives announced another hopeful sign for actual approval of CHS-1701—the FDA and EMA have already passed preapproval inspections of the manufacturing facilities. This could address some of the issues that have tripped up other biosimilar drug makers.

Mr. Hassard believes that Mylan will also receive approval for its delayed pegfilgrastim biosimilar around the same time as Coherus. Rather than plan for a first-to-market launch, he said they were anticipating a launch in a competitive space. “There’s a great deal of room for both us and multiple players. Our plans have always incorporated multiple players. A good example is Zarxio® and Granix®,” he said. “They’ve experienced significant success and have taken about 30% market share each.,” he said. Nonetheless, “We have plans in place to enable us to meet that level of demand even if we are the only biosimilar on the market.”

In addition, Coherus reported progress on the phase 3 clinical development of its adalimumab (CHS-1420) and etanercept (CHS-0214) biosimilars, although timing of its 351(k) submissions are not anticipated soon. The company pointed to extended patent life (adalimumab and etanercept) and lack of commercialization partners (etanercept) for delaying these filings.